CPR Intiative
Editorial

EDITORIAL: Mayor Bowser’s Initiative for CPR Training

The American Heart Association plainly states that those who know how to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, will most likely end up saving the life of someone they love. Yet, more than 70 percent of Americans have never been trained to administer CPR or their training has significantly lapsed. Most notable is the AHA’s statistics which show that nearly 326,000 out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests occur annually, and 88 percent of cardiac arrests occur at home. More specifically, African Americans are almost twice as likely to experience cardiac arrest at home, work or in another public location than Caucasians, and their survival rates are twice as poor as for Caucasians, according to the AHA. [read more…]

People in the African-American community have the nation's highest cancer rates and deaths. (Courtesy photo)
Editorial

EDITORIAL: Cancer Can Strike at Any Time — Get Tested

Throughout the month of October, Americans across the country have been sponsoring walks, raising money, holding educational workshops and remembering those who have died from breast cancer. Black women are particularly susceptible to this insidious disease which is why they have been advised to get tested on an annual basis. Unfortunately, not all women follow the advice of their doctor – if they even have a personal physician.
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Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks at the National Press Club in Northwest D.C. on Oct. 9. PHOTO BY NANCY SHIA
Editorial

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Blacks Need to Arm Themselves Too

I was happy to read William J. Ford’s article “Carson Clarifies Position on Gun Control” in the Oct. 15 edition of The Washington Informer. I agree completely with Dr. Carson’s assertion that if the Jews had been armed, things might have been different in Hitler’s Germany in the 1930’s, and that’s why I suggest that every law-abiding Black person in America go and buy a firearm. Blacks in America are facing very similar tactics from law enforcement and we don’t have to wear a Star of David because we are distinguished by our color. [read more…]

Lemond 'IMAG' Brown, founder of the Swaliga Foundation, leads children in a discussion about technology. (Courtesy of Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington)
Blogs

Swaliga Promotes STEAM-Centered Education

For two years, the Swaliga Foundation has partnered with the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington (BGCGW) to give students an education that integrates science, technology, engineering, and math curricula with the arts. This collaboration has become part of the national STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) movement, which aims to help children adapt and function in modern-day America by coupling what have been considered vastly different subjects.
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D.C. activist and author Tony Lewis Jr. spoke before nearly 200 people at the University of District of Columbia's Theater of the Arts earlier this month. (Courtesy of John Gordon)
Blogs

Tony Lewis Jr.’s Message Gives Students Hope

By his 11th birthday, Tony Lewis Jr.’s father, alleged head of a D.C. drug syndicate, had served nearly two years of a life sentence in a federal penitentiary on the other side of the country. HIs mother also developed what would later be diagnosed as schizophrenia. Even with the guidance of a loving grandmother, Lewis said he navigated life in the District with his street smarts during a time when the city gained a reputation as the “murder capital.” [read more…]

A triumphant Viola Davis shows off her Emmy Award. (Courtesy of houstonchronicle.com)
Blogs

Viola Davis Emmy Win Raises Hollywood Diversity Question

“The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity,” said Viola Davis in her Emmy acceptance speech last month. Since 1982, five black women have been nominated for best actress in a drama series but Davis is the first to win an Emmy for her lead role on ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder” (HTGAWM). “Many of our artists could win these awards, but the opportunity is lacking for black actors and actresses. We are in some ways being oppressed,” said Kyris Brown, 32, director of International Affairs and Admission at Grambling State University in Grambling, Louisiana.
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Editorial

EDITORIAL: Why Did White America Ignore the March?

Anytime more than a dozen Black men gather in a public space, it’s viewed as news – food and fodder for prime-time TV and print media. So, with thousands of Black men, women and children taking over the National Mall last Saturday, you would have expected to see both the leading local and national television outlets and newspapers out in force to get the scoop – the blow-by-blow if you will. Surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly, very little, if anything was said. Silence, for the most part, remained the strategy of the day.
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Gun Control a Hot Button Topic in This year's Presidential
Editorial

EDITORIAL: The Audacity of Demanding Gun Control

How dare the President and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton go on the public airwaves and demand changes in gun ownership in America. How dare they take a tragedy, like the recent mass killing in Oregon at Umpqua Community College, where 26-year-old Chris Harper Mercer, described as an angry, disconnected young man, went on a rampage, killing nine innocent people and injuring others before being shot and killed by law officials, and politicize the situation. [read more…]