HBCU Alumni Soiree Set for September

The alumni of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have partnered with big-named sponsors to present the “Comcast HBCU Alumni Soiree,” an event intended to celebrate the history, legacy and community service of HBCU alumni.

The event organized by the D.C. Metro HBCU Alumni Alliance (DCHBCU), will be held at the National Museum of Women in the Arts on Friday, Sept. 8.

Samuel Washington, co-founder of DCHBCU and member of the Alcorn State University D.C. Metro Alumni Chapter, called the upcoming event “historic,” saying that there are very few events that highlight and celebrate the achievements of HBCU graduates.

“We want to show people how important HBCU alumni are to the D.C. Metro area,” Washington said.

DCHBCU stands as a coalition of about 50 HBCU alumni association chapters in the D.C. region, with about 100,000 alumni residing in the area. Created in 2012, the umbrella organization allows the local HBCU alumni chapters to collaborate on philanthropic and community service initiatives.

Now the group wants to celebrate their accomplishments.

The soiree will be the organization’s first such event, the inaugural fundraiser that honors alumni from HCBUs who have excelled in their careers and made profound impacts on the region.

“This is for all HBCU alumni in the area,” Washington said.

HBCU alumni will be honored at the event for their professional achievements. The awards will be given for excellence in six categories: communications, public affairs, education, business, community involvement and young alumni.

Among those slated to be honored at the soiree are WTTG-TV (Channel 5)’s Allison Seymour and Mississippi Congressman Bennie Thompson.

“HBCUs seem have been given a bad name, for whatever reason, but we want to highlight what HBCU alumni do [for their communities],” Washington said. “HBCU alumni are a major part of the D.C. metro area, and they influence so many fields.”

The black-tie event will proceed with a red-carpet; open bar; hosting by WHUR’s Harold T. Fisher, a D.C. native and Morgan State University graduate, and a performance by the legendary R&B band Midnight Star, which formed at the HBCU Kentucky State University in 1976.

Tickets range from $125-$150 and $100 is tax deductible. More ticket information can be found at dchbcu.org.

Washington said he expects a large crowd based on current ticket sales.

“People are buying the tickets like crazy,” he said.

Washington said proceeds for the event will go to support DCHBCU’s food, higher education and health community service initiatives and to help the alumni chapters and their respective schools.

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About Tatyana Hopkins – Washington Informer Contributing Writer 138 Articles

Tatyana Hopkins has always wanted to make the world a better place. Growing up she knew she wanted to be a journalist. To her there were too many issues in the world to pick a career that would force her to just tackle one. The recent Howard University graduate is thankful to have a job and enjoys the thrill she gets from chasing the story, meeting new people and adding new bits of obscure information to her knowledge base. Dubbed with the nickname “Fun Fact” by her friends, Tatyana seems to be full of seemingly “random and useless” facts. Meanwhile, the rising rents in D.C. have driven her to wonder about the length of the adverse possession statute of limitations (15 years?). Despite disliking public speaking, she remembers being scolded for talking in class or for holding up strangers in drawn-out conversations. Her need to understand the world and its various inhabitants frequently lands her in conversations on topics often deemed taboo: politics, religion and money. Tatyana avoided sports in high school she because the thought of a crowd watching her play freaked her out, but found herself studying Arabic, traveling to Egypt and eating a pigeon. She uses social media to scope out meaningful and interesting stories and has been calling attention to fake news on the Internet for years.