Louis Farrakhan Jr., 60, Son of Nation of Islam Leader, Dies

Louis Farrakhan Jr.
Louis Farrakhan Jr. (Courtesy of the Nation of Islam)

Louis Farrakhan Jr., the eldest son of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, died Saturday at his home in Phoenix. He was 60.

The Nation of Islam said in a statement that Farrakhan had a heart condition that likely contributed to his death.

“The Nation of Islam, with deep sadness, announces the passing of Brother Louis Farrakhan, Jr., the eldest son of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and Mother Khadijah Farrakhan,” the statement read. “We extend our love, support and prayers to the Farrakhan family, the family and children of Louis Jr., the entire Nation of Islam and to all who knew and loved our dear brother.”

The funeral service, or janazah, was held Friday, June 8 at Mosque Maryam in Chicago.

“All who knew Louis knew he would light up any room,” Ishmael Muhammad, son of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad, said at the funeral service. “He had a great sense of humor. He was so brilliant and a very highly intelligent man, very kind, compassionate, warm, generous, always would lend a hand, always helping, would always go the extra step, the extra mile.

“We lost a beautiful son, soldier and comrade in the struggle who loved the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the Nation of Islam and his father,” he said.

Student Minister Ava Muhammad, national spokesperson for the elder Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam, warmly remembered Louis Jr., whom she called a brother and personal friend.

“Louis Jr. had the ability to see into the future and a world coming in that many people cannot envision,” she said, The Final Call reported.

Muhammad shared how she and her husband were godparents to the children of Louis Jr. and how her daughter often sought the counsel of “Uncle Louis.”

“He was advanced spiritually and scientifically in his ability to see that things could be done so much better than they were being done,” Muhammad said.

He is survived by his wife and five children.

“Brother Louis remained committed to the rise of Black people and people of color all over the world all of his life,” said Charlene Muhammad, producer of Liberated Sisters TV. “Possessing exceptional talents and many different skills, Brother Louis was a rare human being best known for being a bold, forward-thinking, communicative individual filled with a positive attitude.

“Gifted with an instinctive natural ability to inspire, Brother Louis was immeasurable and will be missed for many decades to come,” she said.

ADVERTISEMENT

About Sarafina Wright –Washington Informer Staff Writer 328 Articles
Sarafina Wright is a staff writer at the Washington Informer where she covers business, community events, education, health and politics. She also serves as the editor-in-chief of the WI Bridge, the Informer’s millennial publication. A native of Charlotte, North Carolina, she attended Howard University, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. A proud southern girl, her lineage can be traced to the Gullah people inhabiting the low-country of South Carolina. The history of the Gullah people and the Geechee Dialect can be found on the top floor of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. In her spare time she enjoys watching either college football or the Food Channel and experimenting with make-up. When she’s not writing professionally she can be found blogging at www.sarafinasaid.com. E-mail: Swright@washingtoninformer.com Social Media Handles: Twitter: @dreamersexpress, Instagram: @Sarafinasaid, Snapchat: @Sarafinasaid

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*