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Book Signing Celebration for Informer Columnist

Shantella Y. Sherman | 12/3/2009, 8:43 a.m.

Providing words of inspiration come easy for Washington Informer Religion Lyndia Grant. Grant recently pulled much her wisdom together in a ground-breaking memoir called The Sharecropper€s Daughter: It€s Not Where You Begin, But Where You End That Counts.€ To celebrate her debut work, friends of supporters held a booksigning Sat., Nov. 14 at Busboys & Poets in Northwest.

Several of the chapters of the Sharecropper€s Daughter, came to life at the signing, with special presentations by friends, given during the event. Special appearances were made by several of her most influential mentors and role models: Honorable Council member Charlene Drew Jarvis, Ms. Lillian Huff of the Federation for Democratic Women, (who co-hosted the book signing), Barbara Lett Simmons, former School Board Member, and radio show host, and Johnny Barnes, executive director for the ACLU for many years.

Grant charts her sojourn from the daughter of a sharecropper in southern North Carolina to major events planner for the nation€s capital under the direction of Charlene Drew Jarvis.

€This is a story that reminds the reader that achievements begin with a way of thinking; it is a story of inspiration, successes and failures. My story will motivate readers to become goal-oriented if they will only follow the steps set forth in the final chapter of the book,€ Grant said.

Grant believes the book to be a wake-up for the inner sleeping giant in a lot of people and inspire others to become the people they destined to be, without fear. Grant points to her own grandfather who made American history in 1945, by winning a Supreme Court Case and became the official owner of 227 acres of land in Dover, North Carolina.

Grant said her parents Bishop Benjamin Grant and Evangelist, Rev. Fannie Estelle Grant, taught her to set and reach goals. Among her triumphs, Grant counts surviving a seventeen-year-marriage, she termed €brutal€, and from which she jumped from a moving vehicle while pregnant, to escape. Despite the divorce leaving Grant a single parent of three young children, they are all now successful adults.
With faith and her newly acquired success principles, Grant put the steps to a test and she became an entrepreneur, learning the intimate workings of the District. Grant eventually earned Bachelors and Masters degrees, in Communications.

Grant publicly acknowledged Council members Jarvis and Frank Smith, with helping her gain the momentum needed to reach her full potential.

€There is a quote by Rusty Berkus that said, €There comes that mysterious meeting in life when someone acknowledges who we are and what we can be, igniting the circuits of our highest potential€. Well, that, ladies and gentlemen was Council member Charlene Drew Jarvis,€ Grant said at the signing.
Grant said that Smith took up where Jarvis left off, appointing her to serve as project director of The African American Civil War Memorial.

€What an adventure. There is now a national monument at 10th & Vermont Avenue, Northwest, where more than 100,000 people visit each year from around the world. Having been appointed to serve as project director was one of those life-changing moments,€ Grant said.

Grant also thanked Barbara Lett Simmons for allowing her the opportunity to serve as host of €Educationally Speaking€ a Radio-One Program, in Lanham, Maryland, where she served as the radio show host for an entire year in her absence. Finally, Grant told the audience how thankful she was that Dr. Marjorie Harris had taken time from her busy schedule to fly down all the way from Detroit, Michigan. €It was because of Dr. Harris who at the time was President of Michigan€s only Historical Black College, founded more than 80 years ago by her mother Dr. Violet T. Lewis. Dr. Harris insisted that I go to college; if for no other reason, than for credibility, thank you Dr. Harris,€ Grant said.

The Sharecropper€s Daughter is available through PublishAmerica www.publishamerica.com