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BioMedix Vascular Solutions, Inc. Partners With Howard University Hospital

WI Staff Writer | 3/3/2010, 12:52 p.m.

CAPTIONS:
Photo Caption 1 (photo includes patient laying down): Melba Evans, the first of 150 patients evaluated for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) as part of a community health demonstration of Howard University Hospital and BioMedix Vascular Solutions, is tested by Pat Maloney of BioMedix utilizing a telemedicine collaborative care model supported by the BioMedix PADnet technology.

Photo Caption 2 (photo includes physician showing file to female patient): Dr. Kirk Geter, Chief of Podiatry and Assistant Professor of Surgery, Howard University Hospital counsels a patient as part of a community health demonstration utilizing a telemedicine collaborative care model supported by the BioMedix PADnet technology.

Photo Caption 3 (photo consists of two men): One of 150 patients evaluated for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) as part of a community health demonstration of Howard University Hospital and BioMedix Vascular Solutions, Larry Hill, is shown here with John Romans, president/CEO, BioMedix.


To Showcase High-Quality, Cost-effective Collaborative Care Model

Howard University Hospital has run a community health demonstration project to evaluate patients for a potentially deadly and common, yet under-diagnosed, condition using a new model that connects patients with specialists faster - more than 150 patients were evaluated and referred to specialists as appropriate, and several organizations were on hand to experience how this model works.

The condition is called PAD (peripheral arterial disease), a clogging of the arteries in the legs that increases risk of heart attacks and strokes by 6 to 7 percent.
Howard University specialists available for interview include: Dr. Kirk Geter, president-elect of the America College of Foot and Ankle Medicine (the first African America to hold this position), and head of the PAD Coalition's Communications Committee, and surgeon Dr. Kakra Hughes, who is widely published in the area of PAD.

Below is a press release and, in a separate email, I will send the photos. Please let me know if you have any questions or would like to arrange interviews. I am working on this Howard University community health project on behalf of Biomedix Vascular Solutions. Thank you.

BioMedix Vascular Solutions, Inc. announced today that the company has partnered with Howard University Hospital, Department of Surgery to participate in a Community Health Project and Demonstration focused on diagnosing and treating the potentially life-threatening condition called Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD).
There was a two-part goal to the project: reach patients in need of care for PAD and lay out a high-quality, cost-effective plan for evaluating a range of diseases utilizing a telemedicine approach. More than 150 clients, mostly uninsured, were tested utilizing the PADnet non-invasive vascular testing device and supported by a collaborative care model. The project laid out a plan for electronically comparing outcomes while immediately diagnosing patients, and aimed at better treating patients by connecting them to specialists more quickly and improve treatment protocols in a more cost effective way.

All tests were read by Howard University physicians from the Department of Surgery and all patients received a one on one consult with a surgeon. Gwen Tillman, executive director, PAD Coalition at Vascular Disease Foundation was in attendance to help reinforce the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment of PAD and observe the process.

Significantly under diagnosed but common, PAD (Peripheral Arterial Disease), sometimes known as peripheral vascular disease or PVD, may be life-threatening if undiagnosed and impacts approximately 5.25% of Americans.

People with PAD have a six to seven times greater risk of suffering coronary artery disease, heart attack and strokes than the risk for people who don't have PAD, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Arteries can slowly become narrowed or blocked as a consequence of age, smoking, high blood cholesterol or diabetes, and less blood reaching the muscles in the legs can make them hurt and increase the risk of clots. PAD can usually be effectively treated by a healthier lifestyle, daily exercise and medications to decrease leg pains and improve one's chance of avoiding heart attack or stroke.

For more information about PAD contact 866.PAD.INFO (866.723.4636) or visit www.vdf.org.