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Did the D.C. Council act in District residents' best interest when they passed the living wage bill?

WI Staff | 7/23/2013, 6:32 p.m.

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Farrah Darbouze Washington, D.C. If Wal-Mart isn’t willing to pay its employees the living wage, those jobs don’t need to be here in D.C. I understand that there are certain people in Wards 7 and 8 who are having difficulty finding employment [however], I believe the best jobs for them are the ones that will pay the living wage. If the District is popular and attractive enough for big-box stores such as Wal-Mart, then its executives should understand that the community needs jobs that will pay [residents] a living wage.

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Delores Magnani Great Mills, Md. I think it’s only fair that Wal-Mart employees in the District earn living wages. How are they ever going to expect to make enough money to stay about the poverty line? I think Wal-Mart can afford to pay District residents a living wage. The store has no shortage of customers and should be able to give back to its employees.

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Floyd Smith Washington, D.C. Wal-Mart should pay its D.C. employees a living wage. By the company saying it doesn’t want to, is almost a form of enslavement. I don’t see how a person who lives in the District can survive just off of the [$8.25] minimum wage alone, especially a single parent – they just can’t. I make more than the minimum wage, yet I’m living paycheck-to-paycheck. I know for a fact that I couldn’t live off of the minimum wage.

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Carol Winter Silver Spring, Md. The move is typical of Wal-Mart and its executives. It’s always about keeping people enslaved. [Company executives] want people to shop at their stores and do business, and quite a few people on the lower end of the socio-economic scale shop there. But the company refuses to pay its employees above [the $8.25] minimum wage. I refuse, and will continue to refuse to shop at Wal-Mart due to the treatment its employees receive from executives.

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Ryan Grant Greenbelt, Md. I think it’s petty that Wal-Mart executives are arguing over what are essentially pennies to the company, especially considering that the Walton family [the owners of Wal-Mart] is worth tens of billions of dollars. The Washington D.C. area is one of the most expensive to live, but the company doesn’t want to raise pay to help compensate its employees. It’s especially frustrating because the company demands so much of its employees – many can’t even take Black Friday off. Wal-Mart demands a lot from its employees without wanting to compensate them fairly.