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D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson is in the process of closing 15 District schools. Is Henderson any different than her mentor and predecessor, Michelle Rhee?

Timothy Linden | 6/6/2013, 10 p.m.

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Charlyndria Horton Washington, D.C. While Henderson’s policies are similar to Rhee’s, I don’t believe she’s as extreme. Closing the proposed schools is not going to solve any problems at all – it just won’t. It will only make the educational system in the District worse and the affected children will have to be taken to other parts of the city. They should be able to attend a school in their neighborhood. Busing children to other neighborhoods, while neglecting true educational needs, is not the solution.

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Fatmata Fidika-Zulu Washington, D.C. While I believe it was good to have Kaya Henderson on board to immediately replace Michelle Rhee at that particular time, I’m not sure enough thought was given to her background and how it made her qualified to serve as chancellor. I’m not exactly pleased with the direction she’s taken. It feels the same as it did under Rhee and all that has really changed is the [chancellor’s] face.

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Jacquline Avent Washington, D.C. I believe they are very similar. Henderson wants to close 15 schools which not only force the children to have to commute to another school, but it will put countless teachers and school administrators out of work. Instead of closing these proposed schools, more emphasis should be placed on improving the education of the students and fairly compensating the teachers for the work they continue to do.

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Cynthia Harrison Washington, D.C. I absolutely believe Kaya Henderson is a reincarnation of Michelle Rhee. I understand the demographics are changing and areas that were previously saturated with children are no longer so, but we still need education services and institutions in those communities. School closings and mergers – and I’m not against charter schools – really makes me wonder about the future of the public school system in Washington, D.C. It is really unfortunate.

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Marcia Green Washington, D.C. The problem isn’t solely with Henderson. The focus is to spend less on public schools in the District of Columbia. It’s a result of people not wanting to put money into public education. Children living in areas that aren’t particularly the best, are starting to move to charter schools and charter schools are starting to expand to areas in Wards 7 and 8.