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African Spiritual Organizations Gather in a Sacred Circle

Barrington M. Salmon | 3/27/2013, 1:52 p.m.

Hundreds of guests are expected to take part in a spiritual ceremony that will bring together more than a dozen local African spiritual organizations, and members of several nationalist, cultural and African-centered groups.

The Sacred Healing Circle was organized by The African Traditional Spiritual Coalition to bring together people of like mind to receive spiritual healing in their lives and relationships, while also strengthening the ties that bind African organizations.

The sacred circle, while primarily comprised of practitioners of the Akan, Kamitic, Vodoun and Yoruba spiritual traditions, is open to people of all faiths and backgrounds.

"Beyond the physical, we're calling on God Almighty and the spiritual helpers. We call on them to bring their energy, balance to our homes, communities, this country and the world," said Nana Kofi Asinor Boakye. "The event is very important. The healing practices that our ancestors have used for eons, such as drums, shekeres and bells are for healing. They are very ancient traditions that modern science and medicine is just catching up to."

His daughter, Iya Nana Afua Badu Oshundara Aduke, agreed.

"The healing circle is very important because there are so many issues that we're facing as people," she said. "People from all walks can come together to pray for the things we all need. More people are on the same page and that means room for more change."

"This is a time for people to come, let go and release the everyday life stuff we hold onto. This allows those who don't know much about African spirituality to come and see the proper way. Guests can expect a lot of spiritual energy and a lot of prayer. If they're open and receptive they can have some life-changing events take place in their lives. There will be a lot of interaction with people willing to explain things that others don't understand."

Nana Badu said the Sacred Circle also offers practitioners of African spirituality the chance to come together, honor Almighty God and the Ancestors and gain the strength that comes from communing and praying together.

"It's a time for us spiritualists to come together for ourselves and put our healing energies together, she said. "There is one Supreme Being. We're just supporting each other and being the best that we can be. Instead of talking about it, we're doing it. We're moving forward and stepping out in other ways."

The Sacred Circle came into being in 1999 after Chief Iya N'Ifa Ifarinoola Efunyale, (Mother) Taylor of the Yoruba Temple of Spiritual Elevation and Enlightenment had a vision during a meditation at a regular temple service. Mother Taylor felt that the vision was a warning by the spirit of the upcoming era, as they had seen and heard of disasters during the previous year. Heeding the warning she heard in the vision, Mother Taylor called together spiritual houses in the D.C. area to hold a unity prayer circle for the new millennium. Fourteen spiritual houses answered the call and came together with the African community in a sacred healing circle.