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Wake Forest Offers Graduate Opportunities to Ron Brown Scholars

Dorothy Rowley | 4/22/2014, 1:35 p.m.
Officials at Wake Forest University recently announced that the predominantly white institution has forged a partnership to promote and support ...
Courtesy of ronbrown.org

Officials at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., recently announced that the predominantly white institution has forged a partnership to promote and support opportunities for Ron Brown scholarship recipients to pursue graduate studies at the university's business school.

The partnership with the scholarship program, founded in honor of the late former Secretary of Commerce, will allow one scholar to receive a full-tuition scholarship and a $10,000 stipend to enroll in the university's 10-month master's program for management.

"Valuing diversity, leadership and service is core to our mission at Wake Forest," said Charles Iacovou, vice dean at the School of Business. "The Ron Brown Scholar Program embodies this ideal and we are proud to establish a deeper relationship with this outstanding organization and its exceptional group of students and alumni who share these principles."

Brown, a former Secretary of Commerce and chair of the Democratic National Committee, died in a plane crash in 1996. The Charlottesville, Va.-based scholar program, which provides top students with financial resources to attend some of the country's finest colleges and universities, was established in 1997 in his honor by the CAP Charitable Foundation.

The new partnership will also allow Wake Forest officials to collaborate with the scholar program to identify candidates for the university's annual Corporate Fellowship Award as well as other students who are interested in graduate programs in the university's business school.

The agreement represents one of several new initiatives Wake Forest is pursuing to increase the number of underrepresented students across its graduate and undergraduate business programs.

In 2012, Wake Forest celebrated the 50th anniversary surrounding the admission of Ed Reynolds, the first black undergraduate student to be admitted to the university.