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Black Journalists' Organization Inducts New Hall of Famers

Dorothy Rowley | 1/22/2014, 12:59 p.m.
Eight highly accomplished African-American journalists have joined the National Association of Black Journalists' roster of legendary newsmakers.
From left: Moses Newson, Shelia Solomon, Herb Boyd, Maureen Bunyan, Bernard Shaw and Jay Harris pose with their awards after being inducted in the National Association of Black Journalists' Hall of Fame on Thursday, Jan. 16 in D.C. Photo by Roy Lewis

Eight highly accomplished African-American journalists have joined the National Association of Black Journalists' roster of legendary newsmakers.

During a recent ceremony at the Newseum in Northwest, the association paid homage to Maureen Bunyan, veteran television news broadcaster and founder of the organization; Herb Boyd Herb Boyd, filmmaker, activist, and teacher; Jay Harris, who holds the Wallis Annenberg Chair in Journalism and Democracy at the University of Southern California; Moses Newsom, respected reporter from the civil rights era; Bernard Shaw, who retired from CNN in 2001; cartoonist Zelda "Jackie" Ormes; Ernest Dunbar, New York City editor and author; and Lee Thornton, the first African-American woman to cover the White House regularly for CBS.

Ormes, Dunbar and Thornton were posthumously honored.

For the past 23 years, the organization has annually paid homage to black journalists who have made outstanding contributions to the industry.

More than more than 55 preeminent journalists have been inducted into the association's Hall of Fame, including District broadcast anchor Jim Vance, Ebony/Jet magazine founder John H. Johnson and trailblazing reporter Simeon Booker.

Bunyan, an evening news anchor for WJLA-TV in Washington and chair of the association's Hall of Fame committee, was named "Washingtonian of the Year” in 1992.

"The board had previously wanted to induct founder Bunyan into the Hall of Fame but she declined because she felt her being the chair was a conflict of interest," said Bob Butler, the association's president. "But the board felt the honor was long overdue and unanimously voted for her induction."