The World’s Biggest Car Company Wants to Get Rid of Gasoline

In this May 8, 2013 file photo, Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda speaks during a news conference at the automaker's headquarters in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, File)
In this May 8, 2013 file photo, Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda speaks during a news conference at the automaker's headquarters in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, File)
In this May 8, 2013 file photo, Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda speaks during a news conference at the automaker’s headquarters in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, File)

 

(Business Week) – The first thing you notice about the Mirai, Toyota’s new $62,000, four-door family sedan, is that it’s no Camry, an international symbol of bland conformity. First there are the in-your-face, angular grilles on the car’s front end. These deliver air to (and cool) a polymer fuel-cell stack under the hood. Then there’s the wavy, layered sides, meant to evoke a droplet of water. It looks like it was driven off the set of the Blade Runner sequel.

Just as the Prius has established itself as the first true mass-market hybrid, Toyota hopes the Mirai will one day become the first mass-market hydrogen car. On sale in Japan on Dec. 15, it will be available in the U.S. and Europe in late 2015 and has a driving range of 300 miles, much farther than most plug-in electrics can go. It also runs on the most abundant element in the universe and emits only heat and water—and none of the gases that lead to smog or contribute to global warming. “This is not an alternative to a gasoline vehicle,” says Scott Samuelsen, an engineer and director of the National Fuel Cell Research Center at the University of California at Irvine. “This is a quantum step up.”

The Mirai is hardly a speedster, though it’s quicker than a Prius. It can reach 100 kilometers (62 miles) per hour in 9.6 seconds. When you punch it, the car feels like an electric—there’s none of the vibration of a combustion engine. Driving the Mirai around a large, man-made island in Tokyo Bay called Odaiba is a little surreal.

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