CommunityStacy Brown

D.C.’s Arriving Immigrants Outnumber Exiting Residents: Census

The population of the District of Columbia continues to grow.

Now the sixth-most populous region in the nation, the District now has a large share of immigrants, according to the latest Census Bureau estimates.

Nearly 3,600 people from foreign countries moved into the District between July 2017 and July 2018, according to estimates. That number more than triples that of the 1,000 District residents who moved out of the city.

The District’s overall population is estimated at 702,455, up 16.7 percent over the 601,723 from 2010. African Americans comprise 47.1 percent of District residents while whites make up 45.1 percent.

Approximately 14 percent of D.C. residents are foreign born, according to the Census Bureau.

There are approximately 15,380 District residents who were born in Africa, 18,262 born in Europe, 22,067 born in Asia, 43,573 born in Latin America, 1,971 in Canada and 607 in Oceania, according to the Migration Policy Institute.

Between 2010 and 2016, the number of immigrants in the United States increased by 9 percent and the foreign-born population grew by 15 percent or more in 15 states.

In those 15 states, approximately 9 million immigrants reside – or one in every five residents.

No new metropolitan areas made it into the 10 most populous between 2017 and 2018, Sandra Johnson, a demographer at the Census Bureau, said in a statement.

“One interesting trend we are seeing this year is that metro areas not among the most populous are ranked in the top 10 for population growth,” Johnson said.

Earlier this year, the Council of Governments’ “The State of the Region: Human Capital Report” provided a snapshot of the District and outer region’s immigrant population.

“The proportion of the metro region’s population that are foreign-born has been greater than the U.S. average and that continues,” said Executive Director Chuck Bean. “When it comes to educational attainment, about 42 percent of the region’s immigrant population holds a bachelor’s degree or higher.”

Bean noted that it compares with 49 percent of the general population in the D.C. region and 31 percent nationally.

Overall, about one in 10 U.S. counties grew in the fiscal year that ended last June mostly because of immigration and, as noted in the Wall Street Journal, it shows how new arrivals are shaping the nation as the population ages and the birthrate slows.

The Brookings Institution noted that the Census Bureau’s latest population estimates demonstrate that America’s renewed population dispersal is real.

Growth in major metro areas and urban cores evident earlier in the decade are diminishing, and renewed growth is occurring in suburbs, exurbs, and more small towns and rural areas.

“As domestic migration drives these shifts, immigration is becoming an even more important contributor to growth in both large urban areas and smaller-sized regions with otherwise stagnant or declining populations,” the Brookings report noted.

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Stacy Brown

I’ve worked for the Daily News of Los Angeles, the L.A. Times, Gannet and the Times-Tribune and have contributed to the Pocono Record, the New York Post and the New York Times. Television news opportunities have included: NBC, MSNBC, Scarborough Country, the Abrams Report, Today, Good Morning America, NBC Nightly News, Imus in the Morning and Anderson Cooper 360. Radio programs like the Wendy Williams Experience, Tom Joyner Morning Show and the Howard Stern Show have also provided me the chance to share my views.

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