Education

Howard U., National Institutes of Health Partner to Train Junior Faculty

Howard University has partnered with the National Institutes of Health to launch a pilot program called the NIH-Howard University Intramural Research Collaboration.

The collaboration aims to successfully position Howard’s medical students and faculty among the nation’s top research investigators.

“The purpose of the NIH-HUIRC collaboration is to engage in collaborative scientific discovery through research and development of joint training programs between NIH and Howard University,” said Hugh Mighty, dean of the College of Medicine and Howard University’s vice president of clinical affairs. “We expect junior faculty who participate in the NIH-HUIRC to develop the requisite skill sets to procure external grants and enhance scholarly productivity.”

The first phase of the NIH-HUIRC engages a two-year pilot to help junior faculty, graduate, and medical students to identify ways to address routine and recurring issues that arise in scientific research collaborations.

Afterward, the program will expand to include faculty and students from other academic programs at Howard.

“NIH is delighted to have Howard University as a partner,” stated John Gallin, chief scientific officer and associate director for clinical research at the NIH. “We are excited about the prospect of leveraging our diverse communities to optimize the research and training at both our institutions.”

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