Community

Uncertainty Remains Even as Shutdown Ends

Jasmine Middlebrooks joined dozens of other applicants to apply for work as a substitute teacher or paraprofessional with the Prince George’s County public school system during a job fair in Upper Marlboro to help federal workers affected by the partial government shutdown.

Middlebrooks has two children and one of them attends Accokeek Academy, where Middlebrooks said she could possibly work as a substitute teacher.

The six-hour job fair on Friday, Jan. 25 came as President Donald Trump ended the longest shutdown in U.S. history after 35 days.

Prince George's County Executive Angela Alsobrooks (right) greets a driver who dropped off donations at the Wayne K. Curry Administration building for residents affected by the partial federal government shutdown on Jan. 25. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks (right) greets a driver who dropped off donations at the Wayne K. Curry Administration building for residents affected by the partial federal government shutdown on Jan. 25. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)

“On my way here, I found we’re opening until Feb. 15, but that’s why I’m doing this just in case this happens again,” said Middlebrooks of Accokeek, who has worked for five years as a FOIA analyst for the Department of Homeland Security. “It’s unbelievable people have to go through this.”

Danny Schaible of Hyattsville found a unique way to pass the time Saturday while away from his job with the National Park Service, plunging into the Potomac River with his 11-year-old daughter Lucinda while fighting for stronger environmental policy.

Schiable, a member of the county’s Democratic Central Committee, said he’s now endured two government shutdowns in his 13 years with the park service and is “keeping hope alive” another will not happen.

“I was happy with the news to go back into the office and get caught back up with all my projects and start drawing a paycheck again,” he said. “It’s an improvement from where we were [Friday]. Our leadership is not going to be cavalier in shutting things down, as was the case before this recent shutdown, so there were some lessons learned.”

But Trump said the three-week deal he signed with Congress only allows more time for negotiations on the $5.7 billion he demands to construct a wall along the Mexico border.

“If we don’t get a fair deal from Congress, the government will either shut down on Feb. 15, again, or I will use the powers afforded to me under the laws in the Constitution of the United States to address this emergency,” he said.

Tags
Show More

William J. Ford – Washington Informer Staff Writer

I decided I wanted to become a better writer while attending Bowie State University and figured that writing for the school newspaper would help. I’m not sure how much it helped, but I enjoyed it so much I decided to keep on doing it, which I still thoroughly enjoy 20 years later. If I weren’t a journalist, I would coach youth basketball. Actually, I still play basketball, or at least try to play, once a week. My kryptonite is peanut butter. What makes me happy – seeing my son and two godchildren grow up. On the other hand, a bad call made by an official during a football or basketball game makes me throw up my hands and scream. Favorite foods include pancakes and scrambled eggs which I could eat 24-7. The strangest thing that’s ever happened to me, or more accurately the most painful, was when I was hit by a car on Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia. If I had the power or money to change the world, I’d make sure everyone had three meals a day. And while I don’t have a motto or favorite quote, I continue to laugh which keeps me from driving myself crazy. You can reach me several ways: Twitter @jabariwill, Instagram will_iam.ford2281 or e-mail, wford@washingtoninformer.com

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker
%d bloggers like this: